Rachel, writing

All things novelling-related as I embark on my self-publishing adventure

Archive for the tag “marketing”

Rachel, not writing

Wicker Chair Sitting at Desk

Sometimes, life gets in the way of writing. I just moved: it wasn’t intentional, but as I’m currently renting and the owner of the property passed away, the tenancy ended. So, I embarked on househunting and moving madness and all the accompanying admin, made rather more challenging by my husband being abroad for the duration.

In some ways, it wasn’t such a bad thing. It was a well-timed fresh start, as it’s been quite difficult to let go of  ‘The Syndrome Diaries’ and get stuck into a new project. However, I really ought to have been marketing on full throttle as Christmas is a peak time for book purchases and for people to receive empty Kindles. And I didn’t. I also did almost no work on my PhD, at a time when I ought to have been promoting a study (if you’re planning on starting an exercise programme in the first quarter of 2013, you can take part: info is here and the link to sign up is here – that’s my shameless plug done for this blog).

So how many copies of Syndrome have I sold recently? Erm, not very many. But I received my first royalty payment! It wasn’t huge, but to have earned money from the novel is such a fantastic feeling. It was a bit like crossing the finishing line the first time I ran a marathon. And in many ways, the same principles are involved: consistent effort, keeping going when you have a setback and never giving up.

So I haven’t given up. I’ve taken a couple of old bits of writing along to the writing group, and had my first stab in many years at writing a short story, inspired by this rather wonderful book. And four seven-hour flights in a month (two visits to hubby) have given me lots of reading time, which is great for inspiration. So I may have slacked off, but I’m re-energised and raring to go in 2013.

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How to write a novel: 7 Prepping the manuscript for an Amazon upload

Light at the end of the tunnel…

After the beta feedback, I revised parts of The Syndrome Diaries and re-read the manuscript a couple of times. Firstly, when you change parts of a novel, you often find that another part stops making sense so you need to read through for continuity. Secondly, I was typo-spotting  – assisted by Dad.

The decision to self-publish

Although I’d originally considered sending The Syndrome Diaries  to an agent, by this point I’d decided to self-publish. There are several reasons why it was unlikely to be accepted:

  1. The main characters aren’t particularly endearing. I think they’re interesting, but this doesn’t make them nice, so they’re difficult to sympathise with.
  2. The conventions of particular genres aren’t followed. In regular women’s fiction, Ben would get his comeuppance for his attitude towards marriage, and Becky would live happily ever after by getting hitched and having children. Of course, there are plenty of women out there who are having wonderful lives without children (I count myself as one of them), but saying so still provokes controversy.
  3. A female author and female narrator have led to the book being assumed to be women’s fiction, but the most favourable reactions among people who heard several extracts during its writing came from men. It’s a bit of a hermaphrodite of a book, so not commercial.

Additionally, if I was lucky enough to get a publishing contract, advances are small, timeframes are long and there’s no guarantee the book would actually get published, yet all my rights to the novel would be handed over. Writing would become a job rather than a hobby (my stint as a fitness instructor showed me what a bad idea that can be) and I love my academic career so don’t have any great motivation to be a full-time writer. On balance, it seemed better to head straight down the self-publishing route.

Formatting the manuscript for Amazon

I’ve read widely on self-publishing, and the most useful books I’ve found are Catherine Ryan Howard’s Self-printing and Ali Luke’s Publishing E-Books for Dummies. They’re both full of common sense and realistic advice rather than hyping themselves up to suggest you’ll be the next John Locke. I used Catherine’s advice on formatting the manuscript and Ali’s guidance on uploading and the various self-publishing options available.

Until the final proofing, I used Scrivener software with the novel template and a separate folder for each chapter. On several occasions, I compiled a mobi document from the manuscript for my Kindle so that I could read the book as an Amazon customer would (compiling a manuscript into a range of formats is one of Scrivener’s strengths). Scrivener made it easy to work through larger changes and edits, but once they were done, and the focus was on typos and grammatical glitches, it made sense to switch to Word. I followed Catherine’s advice in Self-Printing and stripped out the formatting, then applied styles throughout the document (this is a Word software function). I had different styles for chapter headings, for first paragraphs, for the main body of the text and for quotes (there are lots of extracts from a character’s diaries). The only change I made to Catherine’s advice was to use a 12-point font instead of a 10. Although you can adjust font size on a Kindle, it’ll adjust universally, so that if you are reading several books with differently-sized fonts, you have change the settings every time you switch between them. Size 12 font seemed to be more consistent with the other books on my Kindle. I also followed Catherine’s advice to produce the cover art: design it in Word, save it as a pdf and convert that to a jpeg.

I’d expected the formatting to take much longer than it did: it was done in a few hours. I checked it by pasting the entire manuscript back into a Scrivener document – not as separate chapters this time – and compiling it as a Kindle mobi. Most of it was fine, but some chapter headings weren’t formatted. I couldn’t find any reason in the Word document: they had the heading style attached. I got round the problem by pasting from a correctly-formatting chapter heading and changing the number.

At last…time to upload!

Amazon lets you upload a Word document and converts this to a mobi format for you. However, it has a reputation for misbehaving with the style formatting, and my experience was no exception. The first paragraph of a chapter shouldn’t be indented, and my Scrivener mobi was coming out fine. However, Amazon’s conversion indented every paragraph. I dealt with this by producing a Scrivener mobi and uploading that to Amazon instead of the Word document, and that got round the problem.

Apart from the formatting hiccup – which I’ll bypass next time by converting the doc to a mobi myself – uploading to Amazon is actually very quick and easy. The novel was available to download the next day. The final stage? Monitoring, marketing and moving on! That’ll be the subject of the final blog in this series.

If you’d like to look at the formatting of The Syndrome Diaries without buying it, you can download a fairly chunky free sample from Amazon by following the links on my website. Alternatively, for a couple of quid, you can have the whole book!

Trying to keep my promises

Earlier this year, I promised I was going to be open about the performance of The Syndrome Diaries once it was published. However, the contract expressly forbids me sharing the content of Amazon sales reports, and I have to respect that if I don’t want to end up in deep legal do-do. I can tell you that I’m about at the point where, when the royalties arrive, I could buy myself a decent lunch here (my favourite café) and probably just about pay for a friend too. The worries I had – no sales at all, or a flurry of derogatory reviews – haven’t materialised.

The book has been available almost a week. People who expressed an interest while I was writing know the book is now available, although I haven’t exactly blitzed the marketing. Word of mouth is a key part of a book’s success, and I’m keeping my fingers crossed that somebody out there will like it enough to put some little stars next to it on Amazon to help it on its way.

Reading the experiences of successful self-publishers, my current figures are pretty normal for this stage of the process, so I’m happy. The key to increasing the sales? More books! More writing! So that’s what I’m planning to do.

The bit of marketing that people forget

Do you monitor your blog/twitter/Facebook stats?

It’s vital you know what’s working and what isn’t if you’re going to use your  time on social media productively. I know that this blog is the bit of my platform that sees the most action. That’s why this overdue posting is what I should have been doing instead of hanging out quite so much on Twitter.

This blog has been checked out 72 times this week, and it has 4 new followers, despite me not doing very much. This might be because I visited other blogs (I love visiting blogs!) and commented on them.

I’ve been reading tweets (I love reading tweets!) but failing to contribute. Still, I picked up 3 new followers and tweeted 23 times. I’ve tried to diversify my tweets, although they still have a bit of an academic bias. I suspect academics are  my main category of followers, so maybe that’s not so bad – if you want to know why, here’s my day job.

I posted a few times to my Facebook author page, and got a couple of likes for my 1990 youtube indie disco, but there is tumbleweed rolling across the dancefloor. Now that the page is there, it’s not high maintenance, but it’s rather pointless at the moment as a website can provide all the information and more. I’m hoping it will be home to discussions about the book once it’s published (assuming some people buy it!).

I made no effort at all with LinkedIn, and I still don’t ‘get’ it. In return, it made no effort with me.

Ultimately, none of this matters if there is no book. This week (please imagine a small trumpet fanfare) I finished my final ‘does it all hang together?’ read-through of The Syndrome Diaries, so I can now progress to the next stage: formatting it for Amazon.

Last week I mentioned putting together a sheet I could record stats on. Did I do it? Yes I did! That’s where the numbers above are pulled from. They are (ahem) modest, but useful as a picture of what happens if I slack off. That’s a good reason to turn up the activity this week and see how the figures compare.

Do you monitor your author platform? Is there anything you’ve found that surprised you? And do you ‘get’ LinkedIn?

Question Time

I’m currently reading The Best of Catherine, Caffeinated: Caffeine-Infused Self-Publishing Advice by Catherine Ryan Howard, which is a fascinating insight into Catherine’s experiences of self-publishing Mousetrapped, a book she wrote about her experiences working at Walt Disney World. She describes the process she went through to upload her book, the different e-book channels she used, the sales she made and her income, along with what went wrong. I can thoroughly recommend it if you want some insight from someone normal rather than a “You can make a gazillion megabucks tomorrow” type of guide.

I’m hoping to do something similar to Catherine’s book with this blog although my experiences will differ from hers in that my book is fiction. I thought now would be a good opportunity to ask if there was anything people particularly wanted to know. Obviously sales figures and income generate the most curiosity, and I’m quite happy to dish out details. I’m also going to blog about the publishing process along with any steps I take to spread the word.

My timetable is:

August/September: work on the final edits. I’ve had feedback from 3 beta readers, and notes on half the book from the 4th and final beta reader (she’s still reading it). It’s generally been positive, so the editing I’ve yet to do will be polishing rather than any major rewrites.

September: formatting, pricing, uploading to Amazon. I’ve got some idea of what this involves, but I’m not sure exactly how long it will take. I’m hoping another of Catherine’s books, Self-Printed: The Sane Person’s Guide to Self-Publishing will help me out here. No, she’s not paying me to put these links up – I just like her books.

October: The launch!

Is there anything particular you’d like to see me blog about during this period? And what do you want to see post-publication? Let me know, and I’ll do my best to post the information you’d like.

Positioning, Polarising and Publishing

Positioning is all about creating an identity for what you’re offering people. It ties in with branding, and also combines lots of other aspects of the marketing mix that I’ve been covering over the last few blogs. Covers and pricing, for example, are central to positioning.

Since I wrote my last blog entry, there have been some major challenges for me regarding the positioning of The Syndrome Diaries.

I read out an extract at my writing group, expecting the usual suggestions of developing some dialogue, making a character’s motives a little clearer, and so on. But half an hour after I’d finished reading, the room was still engaged in a heated debate regarding the behaviour of one of my main characters. This is perfectly justified: what he’s doing is very polarising and different people are bound to respond to it in different ways. But I wasn’t expecting such a strong reaction, and I was worried that I’d upset people by what I’d written (which is something I have to learn to deal with, as a lot of my writing involves controversial subjects).

Although going to writing groups has improved my writing, the difficulty is that I’m only reading out relatively short extracts, so the way that the whole plot hangs together can’t be immediately clear. Some of the feedback was quite tough to deal with because if I were to implement it, the whole novel would fall apart. I was left wondering whether I’d written something that, ultimately, wasn’t worth putting out there without a complete rewrite.

But after a chat with a couple of the group’s members, the issue is more to do with positioning. While another group had labelled the novel as women’s fiction, it isn’t. It’s too edgy. Much as I love Maeve Binchy’s wonderful story-telling, I’m not writing Maeve Binchy feel-good, happy-ending fiction. The character causing the problem is entitled to do just that (and I don’t think there’s any stopping him), but the book cannot be put in a pink, fluffy category. And I don’t think it ever really was; I was quite surprised that the first group thought that was where it fitted, and so much feedback since then has suggested that it doesn’t.

My parents have now read the completed beta version of the novel: this is the version which is as polished as I can make it without other people reading the entire manuscript. They came up with some ideas for improvements which I agree with, but I was quite surprised at how much they thought should stay as it is – including the ending, which I was considering changing. Although they’re my parents and one might expect a bit of daughter-directed bias, my Dad in particular can be very critical although he’s constructive with it. The beta version is going to another two readers who are acquaintances rather than close friends/family; I trust them to come back with quality feedback, and it’ll be interesting to see whether they think the ending is convincing.

The blogs I’ll be writing over the next couple of months will be about the beta feedback and revisions, and then it’s time to self-publish. I’ll also be documenting the steps to get the book on Amazon, as it’ll be the first time I’ve gone through the process. And then I’ll be covering what happens next (i.e. real sales figures, not those headline-generating, exception-to-the-rule numbers).

If you’d like to follow the novel’s progress you can:

  • sign up to receive alerts when I publish a blog here (there’s a button in the column to the right)
  • join my emailing list
  • see more information on my website

It’s a bit early for speeches, but…

While slaving away over Scrivener may seem an isolated affair, getting my novel to publication stage certainly isn’t something I’m doing on my own. The research grant may not stretch to employing editors and cover designers, but I’m hoping the proceeds from novel sales will stretch to a few beers/curries for the people who’ve had some input. The sixth ‘P’ of the marketing mix is people. These are mine:

Dad: proof-reader extraordinaire. Now and again, I get a phone call which begins in a tone of voice that makes me anticipate news of a tragic death. “Rae,” it says. “That blog you’ve just posted? There’s a typo on the fifth line.”

Nivette: encouraging friend. I told my friend Nivette about my work-in-progress about a year ago. “That sounds amazing,” she said. “You are amazing.” I heart Nivette.

Writers Connect Manchester: writers’ group. I was pretty apprehensive about joining a group, but this lot are great, providing constructive criticism not only on what I’ve written but sharing their ideas about its potential market. I haven’t managed to get there for a while (it’s a bit of a trek, and tends to clash with running activities), but they are lovely.

Renegade Writers, Stoke-on-Trent/Newcastle-under-Lyme: writers’ group. Fortunately, this is only a couple of miles down the road, so most Wednesday evenings you’ll find me in The Red Lion with my fellow Renegades. The writers here are generally more experienced and have more publications under their collective belts than the people I’ve met at Manchester, but they’ve never been anything other than encouraging, and have given some fantastic feedback on my writing which I think has improved it considerably.

My Beta Readers: I have several people lined up to read through the almost-ready Beta version of the novel. I know they’re busy people, and I also know they’ll give me some excellent advice for the final polishing before the book gets uploaded. This is going to be the most scary bit of the process. I’ve been working on the novel for nearly two years, but I’m the only one at the moment who knows the whole plot and the way it fits together. I’m just hoping it makes sense.

Someone who will remain anonymous: I’m not going to spill the beans on who this was. I was in a bookshop with this person, flicking through books on the art of novelling, wondering out loud whether to make a purchase. “I don’t know why you’d want that,” said Anon. “You’re never going to finish that novel anyway.” The determination to prove Anon wrong has helped drive the novelling since then!

Who inspires your writing? And does Anon deserve beer and curry in return for providing motivation?

This is the seventh Blog from a series on marketing. The eighth, and final instalment – on positioning – will follow soon!

The Three Pillars of Promotion

Imagine: your friend has invited you round to her house. She’s having a bit of a get-together, and there’ll be some people there you know, but also lots who you won’t. She answers the door, possibly noting that you’re the only guest who hasn’t brought a bottle, and introduces you to someone you haven’t met before.

“This is Janice,” she says, “We work together.”

“Would you like to buy my book, Janice?” you say. “I’ve got a copy in my bag. It’s on special offer today – only 99p.”

You wouldn’t do that, would you? Few people would… unless they’re on Twitter. And then I unfollow them: end of relationship.

I’m not going to advise you to use Facebook, or Twitter or any other particular social platform; they’ll all come and go. Instead, I’m going to suggest a strategy that applies to whatever medium you use. Here are my three pillars of promotion.

Number One: Be in it for the long term

Relationships take time to grow. I’ve been blogging and posting on threads on various sites for some years now. Although they aren’t writer sites, I’ve found a beta reader, Tweeps and bloggers and  when I publish my novel I know these people will be interested, just as I’m interested in what they’re up to. I’d want them to post a link to their book because I like them as people and so I think I might like their books too, and hopefully they think the same of me. That takes months, if not years, to build.

Number Two: Follow the principle of reciprocity

I’m a research student in psychology, and part of the process of carrying out studies involves getting ethical approval because I have human participants. It’s desirable (though not imperative) that there’s something in it for them; some researchers are able to pay participants for their time, others give them feedback on their results that might help them in some way and others might enter them into a prize draw. I’ve found that if you want to recruit people to do a survey, a box of chocolates on the desk seems to increase the numbers willing to take part, although most of them won’t eat any! The same idea of reciprocity applies in promoting your writing. Writers I follow via Twitter or subscribing to their emails, such as Joanna Penn and Jeff Goins, spend time providing useful information for other writers for free. They’re generous in sharing their discoveries. When they publish a book, I trust that it’ll be of the same quality, and will certainly look at what they’re offering.

Number Three: Deliver on quality

This third point is an amalgamation of the first two. When someone buys your book, it has to be good. This leads to two results: firstly, your reader will be more likely to buy your next book, and secondly, they might recommend it to friends – word of mouth is a form of promotion, but you can only achieve it once you’ve delivered something worth talking about. This is a long-term relationship, where both sides give and take. I’ve read Caitlin Moran’s ‘How to Be a Woman,’ her tweets frequently make me laugh out loud, and when her next book comes out, I’ll be buying it. And here I am, plugging it – if rather explicit feminist hilarity appeals, you might want to check it out.

If you want to sell millions of copies tomorrow, these tips aren’t going to help you do that (but there’s nothing out there that would, and you know that). If, instead of thinking ‘I must promote my new book,’ you thought ‘In five years, I’d like this person to be interested in a book that I haven’t even imagined yet,’ what would be your approach? That’s what creates interest from your market.

This is the fifth blog in a series of eight about marketing.

How much is that novel in the window?

We’re onto the second marketing ‘p’: pricing. This is a real challenge for self-publishers, particularly for a first novel. Every week brings news of some phenomenal self-publishing success, and many of us dream of achieving those lofty sales figures – after all, why publish your work unless you want to reach a wide audience? And wouldn’t it be great to be able to afford to give up your day job?

But these are two separate aims: reaching a wide audience depends purely on sales volume while making writing pay depends on a balance of volume and pricing. Which is more important to you, sales volume or income? What costs do you need to cover? You need to take these issues into account before you set your price.

What are your costs?
I’m going to consider costs first because it’s very tempting to spend money that you won’t recoup. We want our books to be as good as they can be, and for some people, this means professional editing and cover design. Before incurring this cost, writers need to think very carefully. Involvement of professionals is likely to result in improved product. However, will professional input increase sales enough to cover its costs? In my case, the answer is probably not. I’m not well-known, I’m reliant on circles of friends and family and word of mouth to generate sales, and if I sell more than a hundred copies, I’ll be delighted. That’ll probably mean a couple of hundred quid income. If hiring a professional designer and editor quadrupled my sales, I still wouldn’t have covered their costs.

So how much should I charge for my e-book?

I’m going to run through some of the strategies, then discuss how they apply to me, a debut novelist planning to publish online. This is quite a long blog, as there are lots of options – I hope you find it useful.

Price penetration involves setting your price low to maximise sales volume. These are the 75p books you see on Amazon. The advantage of this approach is that people are likely to impulse-buy your book and won’t consider it a risky purchase (if it’s a dud, they haven’t lost much). But the disadvantage is that you will compromise your royalties and possibly give a bad impression of your book. Amazon’s royalties system means that selling a 75p e-book will earn you 26p, while selling a £1.49 e-book brings in £1.04. Will you sell four times as many copies at 75p as you will at £1.49? If the answer’s no, you’ll earn more at the higher price, although your sales volume may be smaller. Bear in mind that ‘cheap’ has connotations of low quality: is that what you want for your book? Is your market looking for a bargain, or will they assume that a low price means the book isn’t much good?

Price skimming is where you set the price high initially, gradually reducing it. Publishers take this approach by publishing a hardback at a premium price for hardcore fans, then a cheaper paperback for those willing to wait and unprepared to pay hardback prices. This is not a strategy for the first-time novelist; you need a solid, devoted fan base.

Premium pricing means pricing your book at the top end of a realistic scale. What is the top price that other novels in your genre by unknown writers are selling for? The advantage is that with this approach, you’ll earn a high royalty for each sale but you need to be absolutely sure you’ll deliver on quality, because at a higher price, there is no scope for the typos and grammatical errors that litter many self-publishing debuts. A higher price carries a greater risk for the buyer and so they are more likely to try a sample before buying. If the opening of your book is a work of genius, this could be an advantage. If anything lets it down, you won’t convert the trial to a sale.

Loss leader describes the freebie: this is where you offer your work for free.
My advice is to avoid this. If you give away the results of many hours of hard work, what does that say about the value you place on efforts and your belief in your abilities? Apart from the obvious consequence that you will earn nothing from your hours of effort, you potentially devalue your writing. The exceptions are brief promotions in the hope of word-of-mouth recommendations, or as a way of increasing sales for your other books if you have a larger portfolio.

Psychological pricing refers to that little trick that we’re all familiar with: £1.99 is much more attractive to buyers than £2.01 because people look at the most significant digit of a price. You’re likely to do better at the slightly lower price, and the loss of royalties per sale is tiny.

So what’s the answer?

There isn’t a correct answer. A book is a unique product, and many authors regularly adjust their prices to gauge the effects. But I can rule out some strategies.

Firstly, I need to consider my aims. I don’t have costs to cover, so any income will be pin money. I don’t have any inclination to give up the day job: I’m a postgraduate research student and I love it! However, research grants are well below the average UK salary and some extra income would be extremely useful. This will be my only e-book when it’s published, so I can’t use it to generate interest in my other novels which are very rough drafts at the moment. This rules out loss-leading, at least for the time being.

Although I won’t have a professional editor or designer, I know from experience that my proof-reader (Hi, Dad!) will pick up tiny errors and ambiguities. Members of my writing group are giving me feedback on extracts and I have a couple of beta readers who have promised to give me objective critiques of my final draft. However, it’s possible that my novel won’t be quite as polished as many books from big publishing houses, making me wary of premium pricing. Neither do I have the fan base to try price skimming.

Nevertheless, my novel’s quality will compare well with other e-books on the market. It’s a decent length – around 90,000 words – and is the product of multiple drafts and input from knowledgeable friends and acquaintances. I’m confident that it’s worth more than 75p. While high sales volumes (and they really would have to be spectacular) could attract a publisher, a publishing contract is not on my wish list and maximising my earnings will have more impact on me than maximising sales volume. This points towards a price above Amazon’s 70% threshold, yet the book needs to compete with established writers and traditionally-published best-sellers, suggesting the price should be under £2.50 and possibly under £2.

I haven’t made a final decision, and would be interested to know what other people think (if you’d like a taster of the style and plot, you can find out more here). Are there particular strategies that have worked – or that haven’t worked – for you?

This blog is the third in a series on marketing for writers. Next time: place. What sales channels should you consider? Yes, that online versus print argument again – and more.

Products, Marketing and the Bad Sex Awards

There is something disconcerting about referring to your novel – 100,000 words of soul-baring – as ‘product,’ as if it were one of a million identikit widgets rolling off a conveyor belt. But, if you want to engage with readers, then they are your market and your book is your product. The challenge is to know and understand something of your potential readers and to deliver what they want.

A novel, like any product, has benefits and features. Its benefits are the core reasons that people might want to buy and read it, and central to this is entertainment. Features deliver the entertainment and include length, format, genre, language, style of writing and plot. The difficulty lies in trying to match these features to the benefit sought by a particular group of readers.

I’ll give you some examples from my own work-in-progress novel (more details here). I love music and know quite a lot about it, and my characters are working in music-related fields. Reading extracts out at the writers’ group I’ve joined generates enthusiasm from the other music obsessives there, but the group members I need to pay most attention to are the ones who don’t fall into this category. Have they heard of the bands that I mention? Do they understand the technical jargon? If not, then I may have gone too ‘niche’ and will need to do some rewriting.

Another dilemma for me is how explicit my novel should be. If you look up the erotic Shades of Grey trilogy on Amazon, you can see that its readers also bought The Hunger Games, a young adult novel where there is no intimacy beyond kissing, and Me Before You, an intense love story without any actual sexual activity. We can conclude that raunch isn’t obligatory for these readers, but they aren’t averse to it in an appropriate context.

In my almost-finished novel, lust and love are central themes of my plot; the characters’ emotional fulfilment relates to what’s happening in the bedroom. Do readers want the detail? And if they do, is it because they enjoy the escapism and some titillation, or because it makes the characters more vivid and helps the plot make sense? There is, of course, the added risk of writing something akin to a Bad Sex Award winner.

There isn’t a right answer, but there are ways of exploring options:
– Take your work to a writers’ group: Other members can give constructive feedback based on their own experiences. You’ll also learn from others’ work and the feedback they receive.
– Recruit beta readers: When your novel is as good as you can make it (your ‘beta’ version), your beta readers will be able to tell you what’s working and what isn’t. Then you edit some more.
– Read bestsellers: What do people like about them? And where are criticisms aimed? How do they work for you?
– Talk to your friends, family and colleagues: What do they love and hate in a book?

Ultimately, you need to make a decision as to where your novel fits then write for those readers. You can’t please everyone. If you can accept that some people will hate what you’ve written, then you have a much better chance of finding readers who will love it.

This blog is the second in a series on marketing for writers: for the first, see 18 May. In the next blog, I’ll be tackling pricing, costs and all things wonga-related.

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